If you can’t be with the one, you love, love the robot you built.

Fed up with his love life—or lack thereof—31-year-old artificial intelligence expert Zheng Jiajia “married” the female humanoid he designed.

A former employee of Chinese multinational telecoms firm Huawei, Zheng left the company in 2014; last year, he joined the Internet village of Dream Town—12 granaries transformed into an incubation center.

The chronically single engineer wed his robot companion, Yingying, in a “simple ceremony” on Friday, the South China Morning Post reported, citing the Qianjiang Evening News. Witnesses included Zheng’s mother and friends.

Qianjiang Evening News

A fairly simple cyborg, Yingying can identify Chinese characters and images, and say a few words.

For the nuptials, she was dressed in a smart black suit and white strappy heels, with her head covered by a red scarf—an old Chinese wedding ritual. (It’s unlikely the couple followed through with the traditional third-day-of-marriage dinner party at the bride’s parents’ home.)

Zheng reportedly intends to upgrade his 66-pound “wife” with the ability to walk and help with household chores. Because that’s what married women do.

Qianjiang Evening News

The union, of course, is probably not entirely legal.

The Marriage Law of the People’s Republic of China, adopted in 1980, states right off the bat that “a marriage system based on the free choice of partners … shall be applied.” It’s hard to believe the insentient Yingying, who can’t even speak, consented to the coupling.

It doesn’t help Zheng’s case that “no marriage may be contracted before … the woman [has reached] 20 years of age”: Yingying was “born” in late 2016, making her less than 12 months old.

Zheng isn’t the first to fulfill his life goals by building a personal android. Last year, Hong Kong-based Ricky Ma spent 18 months and more than $50,000 creating robo-Scarlett Johansson. According to Netease, the look-alike can move its arms and legs, form detailed facial expressions, and respond to verbal commands.

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